Police State Crits #2 – PLURES EX UNO

The Word.

Omnia Omnibus.

Christianity has what humankind needs right now within its reach but way out of its current capacity to grasp and hold.

The Word. Logos. Logic. Rationality. Discourse.

Omnia Omnibus. Everything for everybody.

Put the two together and the result should be democracy and freedom.

But what do I see?

A magnificent heritage which proclaims a welcome for all refugees.

(Just as long as its not someone like me alienated from the land of my birth by a police state bastardry whose rhetoric and propaganda the church supports whenever it can.)

Tries to be local ……..

(…… but then hits out in fear with the accusation of attempted murder when other persecuted peoples’ desperations for freedom upset its comfort zone.)

I could go on.

But what I seek on the whole of this website is dialogue with others.

Living in The Word.

Beneath Bunjil‘s skies.

Geoff Fox, 16th February 2002

POLICE STATE Crits #1

Today is the 80th anniversary of the first day of the World War Two battle which lead to the fall of Singapore.

Singapore fell because much larger British forces could not accurately assess either the size of the enemy or the nature of the British ruled terrain through which the enemy travelled. The British forces couldn’t even talk with each other.

They couldn’t live in The Word. So they lost.

Today my life in the police state of Victoria is in ruins like so many other lives here. That never would have happened if people in Terra Nullius could talk with each other instead of habitually denying each other the basic act of recognition as human beings.

This morning I wrote the poem below for three of them. A trinity. At the end of a service last Sunday to celebrate the 1953 coronation attended by my grandfather Ralph Blanchard and his wife Doris, I remember them in their doorway with their backs to me.

They are human beings without the time to really talk with me. Somewhat powerless. A modern and ancient police state disease. Scribes. Pharisees. Teachers. Doctors. Parents. Priests.

Dear Very Reverend Cannonless Glenn Helen Dean.

I am not scared of God.

But I am scared of evil.

In my words, I still feel free.

You seem proud or scared

or somehow locked

out of talking with me,

but in These Words

I still feel free.

Geoff Fox, 8th February, 2022, Terra Nullius

I Will Tell My Story #7 No Room At The Inn

I have created art displays in Indonesia at places important to General Douglas MacArthur, Barak Obama and Presidents Jokowi and Yudhoyono. I should be helping Australia to be better friends with Indonesia.

But for me in this country there is no room at The Inn.

We should be living with Covid and applying our minds freely to saving our world.

Instead we are crippled by a culture of fear.

We need a restoration of freedom and human rights.

Not more votes for Barabbas.

We need to live in The Word. Rationality. Discourse. Freedom of Speech. Democracy.

Who will deliver that?

Geoff Fox, 25 December, 2021, Down Under

Remembering Mark Twain and Media Driven Fear Of Death.

Mark Twain died on April 21, 1910.

He could call out crap like few other writers in history.

What would he have said about the Coronavirus lockdowns?

We will never know.

Here is his risk analysis response in 1871 to an attempt by a railroad ticket seller to sell him insurance for a train trip:

“I hunted up statistics, and was amazed to find that after all the glaring newspaper headings concerning railroad disasters, less than three hundred people had really lost their lives by those disasters in the preceding twelve months. The Erie road was set down as the most murderous in the list. It had killed forty-six—or twenty-six, I do not exactly remember which, but I know the number was double that of any other road. But the fact straightway suggested itself that the Erie was an immensely long road, and did more business than any other line in the country; so the double number of killed ceased to be matter for surprise.

By further figuring, it appeared that between New York and Rochester the Erie ran eight passenger trains each way every day—sixteen altogether; and carried a daily average of 6,000 persons. That is about a million in six months—the population of New York city. Well, the Erie kills from thirteen to twenty-three persons out of its million in six months; and in the same time 13,000 of New York’s million die in their beds! My flesh crept, my hair stood on end. “This is appalling!” I said. “The danger isn’t in travelling by rail, but in trusting to those deadly beds. I will never sleep in a bed again.” (1871)

Two years later here is what Mark Twain had to say about the newspapers of his era: “It seems to me that just in the ratio that our newspapers increase, our morals decay. The more newspapers the worse morals. Where we have one newspaper that does good, I think we have fifty that do harm. We ought to look upon the establishment of a newspaper of the average pattern in a virtuous village as a calamity.” (1873)

And: “It has become a sarcastic proverb that a thing must be true if you saw it in a newspaper. That is the opinion intelligent people have of that lying vehicle in a nutshell. But the trouble is that the stupid people — who constitute the grand overwhelming majority of this and all other nations — do believe and are moulded and convinced by what they get out of a newspaper, and there is where the harm lies.”

Perhaps what Mark Twain was doing in these quotes was calling out Fake News.

God Bless America, Freedom from Fear and Truth,

For me these are bastions for The Word in the modern world.

Geoff Fox, 21st April, 2020,for  Terra Nullius