MEN SEEK BALANCE

Jesus Christ said “….. the truth will set you free.”

Jesus was not the only very talented man born on Christmas Day.

Isaac Newton, born on Christmas Day in 1642, said ” What we know is a drop, what we don’t know is an ocean.” A circumspect genius.

Charlie Chaplin died on Xmas Day, 1977. He once said, “Failure is unimportant. It takes courage to make a fool of yourself.

In his first movie as a director Chaplin showed sympathy for the life of a deserted single mother and, through his clown persona, showed the glory of fathering which comes from the heart. I was a midwife for 31 years and, for me, The Kid is easily one of the greatest movies ever made.

Jesus was born to a single mother – engaged to Joseph but not yet married.

The immaculate conception didn’t need wedlock.

These three men are worth remembering on Christmas Day.

Jesus Christ: liberating honesty.

Isaac Newton: intellectual modesty from a genius.

Then the courage of a great clown and cultural icon finding true manliness in being a dad.

In the real world, men seek balance.

But, in The West, we dont always get it now.

Geoff Fox, Xmas Day, 2019, Terra Nullius

“The Covered Wagon” – a long lost freedom.

“The Covered Wagon”, released on March 16, 1923, was the first feature length western movie. It is a meticulously authentic portait of the life of American pioneers, who traveled huge distances through hardship and adventure to look for a better life. The following video clip shows some highlights:

 

In his memoir “Reminiscences”, World War Two hero General Douglas MacArthur, who was born in 1880, wrote that his childhood was spent in “ …… the Old West of frontier days ……. nowhere else has there been the savage turbulence, the striking vitality and the raucous glamour of the struggle for law and order in the American West.”

Do we want to restore some of that freedom now?

Geoff Fox, Solo, Indonesia, March 16, 2019

Civilised Freedom: Charlie Chaplin in The Kid

Charlie Chaplin was a story telling genius still loved around the world.

His performance in his 1921 movie, “The Kid”, says this to modern misandrist feminism: men care and children need that care.

Geoff Fox, Java, Indonesia, January 21, 2019, the 98th anniversary of the release of “The Kid”

Fritz Lang’s Metropolis: A Metrosexuality that Nobody Needs?

 

 

Is Fritz Lang’s Metropolis a film about a metrosexuality that nobody needs?

Does the film suggest urbanisation makes healthy life impossible?

In Fritz Lang’s cinematic story of one man’s giant industrial mega-city, the beautiful religious figure Maria, played by 18 year old BrigItte Helm, is pure and caring and gives hope to many people by her faith in fraternity and communication. But then Maria’s physical likeness is stolen to empower a robot who is first presented as an erotic dancer for the rich and who then, under orders, uses manic sexuality to lead people to conflict and destruction.

While still a movie star, BrigItte Helm told one critic that she didn’t care about making movies and she would rather be a housewife, cooking, bringing up her children and looking after her husband. She went to court at great cost to fight for the right not to be forced to play vamps and retired from cinema and moved to Switzerland in disgust at the Nazi takeover of the German film industry.

So in real life Helm wanted to be the motherly Maria not the destructive seductively malevolent dancing Machine imitating Maria.

In modern western nations the sexual liberation of the 1960’s and following decades has given way to the moralistic crusades of the #metoo movement which attacks and destroys men but not women for their sexuality.

Do we want a return to a much more conservative sexual morality imposed on men or do we want gender equal sexual freedom for everyone?

Right now I don’t think many people in The West know what we want with respect to that question.

BrigItte Helm had no doubts about how good it was for her to be a mum.

Geoff Fox, Malang, East Java, 10th January 2019, the 92nd anniversary of the release of Metropolis.

 

The Philadelphia Story and our changing presumptions of innocence.

“I was so much older then, I’m younger than that now.” – Bob Dylan, 1964

On December 26, 78 years ago, during the golden era of The Greatest Generation, a work of art called The Philadelphia Story was released. It told the story of a spirited, independent woman’s awakening to love. In this Katharine Hepburn vehicle, monogamous heterosexuality was seen to meet human need. The film poked fun at marriage and shows its weaknesses but does not reject the institution.

How times have changed in the western world. Marriage is not the place it was.

Heterosexuality as the norm can no longer be assumed or championed.

The story debunked the idea that the Hepburn character Tracy Lord should be treated as a goddess. Her real need was not to be worshiped but to be loved.

Hepburn’s character was shown due to marry an up and coming politician but the night before the wedding she gets very drunk with a writer she admires who is there to report the wedding. They shared two kisses and a late night swim but to some others including her fiancé it appeared like an affair.

When Hepburn said, “I was guilty straight off until I was proven innocent.” Cary Grant, playing her first husband, who still loves her, commented, “Downright un-American if you ask me.”

In the modern world of suffocating political correctness far too many men are now “guilty straight off”.

On the October 2nd, 2018, President Trump described this modern phenomenon by saying: “It’s a very scary situation when you are guilty until proven innocent. My whole life I have heard you are innocent until proven guilty. But now you are guilty until proven innocent. That is a very, very difficult standard.”

As an Aussie fan of America’s great capacity for self-criticism, the anti-male modern climate of fear sounds downright un-American to me.

Geoff Fox, East Java, Christmas Day, 2018