In Memoriam: SAM FOXVOG

Tim Goldich of Chicago remembers his young friend Sam Foxvog, who recently died in a car accident on the way home for Xmas.

“Sam was lovable. He had a sweetness to him. People liked him and you felt like you wanted to protect him, or perhaps, you wanted to protect his innocence.

When driving at night, Sam would pick a spot on the ground, or somewhere under an overpass, and just crash for the night. He certainly wasn’t at all dependent upon creature comforts!

On the 23rd of December (NB the depths of winter in Maryland where the average December overnight temperature is 27.3 degrees Fahrenheit – minus 2.6 degrees Celsius) Sam wrote on facebook of sleeping …. “In the hedgeline by the highway outside my car. I woke up at 8:40 am or so ……. So peaceful.”

He didn’t always make sense; he could talk on and on nonstop without being all that coherent. But when he wrote his thoughts down, he nailed everything with clarity and insight.

But when he’d laugh, I HAD to laugh too. I could not help but laugh, even though I had no idea what we were laughing about, because his laugh was so infectious, so guileless.”

Deeply felt words from Tim Goldich.

Lest we forget: what we all need.

Published by Geoff Fox, 30 December, 2019.

Abe Lincoln: A Civil War Xmas

On the first of December 1862, with his country torn apart in Civil War, President Abraham Lincoln told America, “In giving freedom to the slave we assure freedom to the free—honorable alike in what we give and what we preserve.”

On Christmas Day that year Lincoln visited soldiers in hospitals. Then the president commissioned artist Thomas Nash to create the first modern image of Santa Claus, in the cause of freedom.

What a wonderful Christmas spirit that was: visiting those wounded in a righteous cause and creating art celebrating generosity.

In the modern world, freedom is under constant threat.

Why cant we give freedom to each other anymore?

Why cant we even communicate?

Geoff Fox, Terra Nullius, December 1st, 2019

The Philadelphia Story and our changing presumptions of innocence.

“I was so much older then, I’m younger than that now.” – Bob Dylan, 1964

On December 26, 78 years ago, during the golden era of The Greatest Generation, a work of art called The Philadelphia Story was released. It told the story of a spirited, independent woman’s awakening to love. In this Katharine Hepburn vehicle, monogamous heterosexuality was seen to meet human need. The film poked fun at marriage and shows its weaknesses but does not reject the institution.

How times have changed in the western world. Marriage is not the place it was.

Heterosexuality as the norm can no longer be assumed or championed.

The story debunked the idea that the Hepburn character Tracy Lord should be treated as a goddess. Her real need was not to be worshiped but to be loved.

Hepburn’s character was shown due to marry an up and coming politician but the night before the wedding she gets very drunk with a writer she admires who is there to report the wedding. They shared two kisses and a late night swim but to some others including her fiancé it appeared like an affair.

When Hepburn said, “I was guilty straight off until I was proven innocent.” Cary Grant, playing her first husband, who still loves her, commented, “Downright un-American if you ask me.”

In the modern world of suffocating political correctness far too many men are now “guilty straight off”.

On the October 2nd, 2018, President Trump described this modern phenomenon by saying: “It’s a very scary situation when you are guilty until proven innocent. My whole life I have heard you are innocent until proven guilty. But now you are guilty until proven innocent. That is a very, very difficult standard.”

As an Aussie fan of America’s great capacity for self-criticism, the anti-male modern climate of fear sounds downright un-American to me.

Geoff Fox, East Java, Christmas Day, 2018