I Like Ike And Donald Trump

Nobody should be fooled by President Trump’s blowhard style of political campaigning.

POTUS is firmly in the tradition of great Republican peace makers in the White House.

Abraham Lincoln freed the slaves and saved the Union.

Dwight D. Eisenhower inherited a mess in Korea from Harry Truman but he acheived what has been a lasting peace.

Richard Nixon, a man of the Quaker faith which is profoundly committed to the pursuit of peace, started talking with his communist adversaries.

Ronald Reagan achieved genuine reductions in weapons of mass destruction and, using peaceful methods, the Gipper won The Cold War.

Donald Trump has chosen dialogue with the leader of the worlds’s newest nuclear power, while others try to score political points about this by practicing the demonisation which is second nature to far too many modern progressives in The West.

I believe this current POTUS has shown a better balance of restraint and strength in The Middle East than any American President since George H. W. Bush.

In the little movie above, I have endeavored artistically to create a seamless transition between the thoughts of Eisenhower in his astonishing farewell address and the thoughts of Candidate Trump in 2016, because:

I like Ike.

And Donald Trump.

Geoff Fox, 4th March, Melbourne, Down Under

Augurs Of Freedom

Americans love celebrating their tradition of freedom, especially the presidents on January 20, evry four years when the presidential inauguration takes place.

In his 1953 Inaugural Address, Dwight Eisenhower said, “We are called as a people to give testimony in the sight of the world to our faith that the future shall belong to the free.”

On January 20, 1961, JFK said “……. the rights of man come not from the generosity of the state but from the hand of God.”

In 1969, on the same date, Richard Nixon said, “The essence of freedom is that each of us shares in the shaping of his own destiny.”

Australia does not have the same robust and articulate commitment to liberty.

A few days ago, I asked a bloke, who is the Australian equivalent for me of England’s Samuel Johnson and who knows a fair bit about my situation, “….. do you recognise the trashing in 2016 of my rights under articles 19 and 21 of UDHR?” (freedom of speech and the right to participate in government in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights)

Aussie Sammy answered, “I do. You and many other citizens and non-citizens will experience such outrages but when a Court is involved, they are lawful under the law for the land that applies them – even when, as I say, the greater human right is being trashed.”

This fella was talking to me about a country he loves more than I can. He showed great personal integrity in speaking so honestly.

I cant live with this sort of “legality” where The Law and those responsible for it can destroy the foundations of democracy with impunity. In my case this was done when I was trying to celebrate democracy and freedom.

I cannot pretend to be willing to be a part of such a country.

Geoff Fox, 20th January, 2020, Terra Nullius.

In Memoriam: SAM FOXVOG

Tim Goldich of Chicago remembers his young friend Sam Foxvog, who recently died in a car accident on the way home for Xmas.

“Sam was lovable. He had a sweetness to him. People liked him and you felt like you wanted to protect him, or perhaps, you wanted to protect his innocence.

When driving at night, Sam would pick a spot on the ground, or somewhere under an overpass, and just crash for the night. He certainly wasn’t at all dependent upon creature comforts!

On the 23rd of December (NB the depths of winter in Maryland where the average December overnight temperature is 27.3 degrees Fahrenheit – minus 2.6 degrees Celsius) Sam wrote on facebook of sleeping …. “In the hedgeline by the highway outside my car. I woke up at 8:40 am or so ……. So peaceful.”

He didn’t always make sense; he could talk on and on nonstop without being all that coherent. But when he wrote his thoughts down, he nailed everything with clarity and insight.

But when he’d laugh, I HAD to laugh too. I could not help but laugh, even though I had no idea what we were laughing about, because his laugh was so infectious, so guileless.”

Deeply felt words from Tim Goldich.

Lest we forget: what we all need.

Published by Geoff Fox, 30 December, 2019.

Abe Lincoln: A Civil War Xmas

On the first of December 1862, with his country torn apart in Civil War, President Abraham Lincoln told America, “In giving freedom to the slave we assure freedom to the free—honorable alike in what we give and what we preserve.”

On Christmas Day that year Lincoln visited soldiers in hospitals. Then the president commissioned artist Thomas Nash to create the first modern image of Santa Claus, in the cause of freedom.

What a wonderful Christmas spirit that was: visiting those wounded in a righteous cause and creating art celebrating generosity.

In the modern world, freedom is under constant threat.

Why cant we give freedom to each other anymore?

Why cant we even communicate?

Geoff Fox, Terra Nullius, December 1st, 2019

Tim Goldich Interview: The Glass Escalator

I am Geoff Fox, a former midwife, and now a dissident MRA in Australia.

On June 19 this year, I renounced my Australian citizenship in writing to Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison. It is now late November and “ScoMo” has not yet replied.

The following is an interview about this situation with Tim Goldich, the president of the Chicago chapter of America’s National Coalition For Men.

GF: What does the fact that ScoMo has not even responded to my renunciation of Australian citizenship say to you about care for men in The West?

TG: It is in keeping with a general drought of compassion toward men.

Currently, women are so powerful, and draw so much empathy, that men’s issues are completely ignored.

In the realms of gender advocacy, gender issues, gender politics, gender anything, there is feminism on the one hand and on the other hand there is . . . . . . . . . . nothing.

GF: What would you like to say to ScoMo about his failure to respond?

TG: I would say: “I get it that you don’t want to be the sole politician in Australia that speaks of men’s issues. It may seem to you that responding to male concerns is akin to political suicide, but infinitely catering to feminism is societal suicide.

Exactly zero women out there are complaining of an over-abundance of confident, ambitious, successful, high-earning men.

Man can only pour from his glass half “full” into Woman’s glass half “empty” for so long before you get Japan—a society in which 1 in 4 below the age of forty has never once had heterosexual sex.”

GF: ScoMo has said “We want to see women rise, but we dont want to see women rise on the basis of others doing worse.” How do you rate this statement compared to other national leaders’ positions?

TG: Given the gender-political climate, I think Mr. Morrison’s sensible comment was extremely brave. I deeply hope that he can survive it. Much will depend on whether or not others back him.

I believe Mr. Morrison is attempting to draw a line on the multiple Glass Escalators feminism has put in place in their efforts to force “equality.” Which is to say, female-only “equality,” which is not equality at all.

Perhaps Mr. Morrison glimpses the big picture here and realizes that when women “have it all,” men are left with too little to be significantly and long-lastingly desirable (as lovers, as spouses, and as parents). In other words, men become increasingly superfluous and that’s how Japan ended up with a population of male “grass eaters” that ignite little passion in women.

GF: In 2016, I was arrested by police and silenced at election time while a female politician, of whom I was critical, was reelected and protected by the threat of 2 years jail from any comment by me about her.

The woman is now mayor of Maribyrnong …….. I am still suffering from subsequent PTSD ……. In your view does that constitute the rise of a woman by pushing me down?

TG: In a word, yes.

In the U.S., affirmative action quotas, 1,027 federally funded female-centric organizations of all kinds, scholarships, grants, billions of dollars devoted to the emotional, professional, domestic, and scholastic wellbeing of women plus enormous societal pressure to hire and promote women all Glass Escalator women.

Compare that with males—scholastically sabotaged, homeless, and imprisoned by the millions—and yeah, I think it’s fair to say that women are advantaged at the expense of men.

(Tim Goldich is the author of “Loving Men, Respecting Women: The Future of Gender Politics” and the president of the Chicago chapter of the National Coalition For Men. )

“The Covered Wagon” – a long lost freedom.

“The Covered Wagon”, released on March 16, 1923, was the first feature length western movie. It is a meticulously authentic portait of the life of American pioneers, who traveled huge distances through hardship and adventure to look for a better life. The following video clip shows some highlights:

In his memoir “Reminiscences”, World War Two hero General Douglas MacArthur, who was born in 1880, wrote that his childhood was spent in “ …… the Old West of frontier days ……. nowhere else has there been the savage turbulence, the striking vitality and the raucous glamour of the struggle for law and order in the American West.”

Do we want to restore some of that freedom now?

Geoff Fox, Solo, Indonesia, March 16, 2019

The Philadelphia Story and our changing presumptions of innocence.

“I was so much older then, I’m younger than that now.” – Bob Dylan, 1964

On December 26, 78 years ago, during the golden era of The Greatest Generation, a work of art called The Philadelphia Story was released. It told the story of a spirited, independent woman’s awakening to love. In this Katharine Hepburn vehicle, monogamous heterosexuality was seen to meet human need. The film poked fun at marriage and shows its weaknesses but does not reject the institution.

How times have changed in the western world. Marriage is not the place it was.

Heterosexuality as the norm can no longer be assumed or championed.

The story debunked the idea that the Hepburn character Tracy Lord should be treated as a goddess. Her real need was not to be worshiped but to be loved.

Hepburn’s character was shown due to marry an up and coming politician but the night before the wedding she gets very drunk with a writer she admires who is there to report the wedding. They shared two kisses and a late night swim but to some others including her fiancé it appeared like an affair.

When Hepburn said, “I was guilty straight off until I was proven innocent.” Cary Grant, playing her first husband, who still loves her, commented, “Downright un-American if you ask me.”

In the modern world of suffocating political correctness far too many men are now “guilty straight off”.

On the October 2nd, 2018, President Trump described this modern phenomenon by saying: “It’s a very scary situation when you are guilty until proven innocent. My whole life I have heard you are innocent until proven guilty. But now you are guilty until proven innocent. That is a very, very difficult standard.”

As an Aussie fan of America’s great capacity for self-criticism, the anti-male modern climate of fear sounds downright un-American to me.

Geoff Fox, East Java, Christmas Day, 2018