An Aussie Engineer in Morotai

This is footage of a work of art in my amateur art display in Morotai.

According to the indigenous land-owner, my father’s soul found peace in that grassroots place with its human soul.

For all its shortcomings, this art display, along with my other Indonesian art displays, has probably been the crowning achievement of what was my life as an Austral-Indonesian Word Artist.

When I tried to share this in what is now for me the police state of Victoria, I was stripped of my civic, human, and democratic rights. Such is life for far too many men in modern Australia and right across the Western World. We are far too often not allowed to have the life we should have anymore.

I had a life in accordance with those principles as a midwife for over a quarter of a century.

I am now too hurt and ashamed of that country to pretend to want to be an Australian anymore.

Geoff Fox, 19th February, 2020, Terra nullius

Conservatives – The Future’s Best Conservationists.

For a long time the progressive side of western politics has largely owned the issues relating to the environment. (Apologies to Margaret Thatcher and Arnold Schwarzenegger.)

I predict that conservatives will become the best conservationists because conservatives care about conserving what is good.

Conservatives are often better at being humble about their responsibilities to the created world gifted to us (as I believe) through the evolutionary process from A God worshipped by most of the world’s people. As I wrote for the concluding words spoken at an international Islamic  environmentalist conference in Bogor, Indonesia, about a decade ago: “God is green.”

How can progressive thinking which so often ridicules faith in God connect with the whole world on issues vital to the whole world.

Progressives are their own gods. They seem to think they themselves are omnisicient. In the real world, intellectual humility works better. This requires a balance of respect for past, present and future not trendy self-absorption.

Progressives cannot stop themselves from making the world worse by trying to change things which don’t need changing. Look at the way the Presumption of Innocence and the principle of Beyond Reasonable Doubt in Australia have gone out the door in Victoria’s shameful persecution of Cardinal George Pell.

Pell’s persecution was initiated by the same police who trashed my rights in the same court system where Pell suffered. The progressive side of Australian politics produced my sufferings at the hands of police when I wanted to combine environmental tree planting with memorial tree planting on vacant defence department land in my own neighbourhood. Interviewing me to hear my side of the story before locking in court action was never considered by them.

Progressives aren’t happy unless they are changing something, anything. This can mean they then toss out what is good from the past and feel that just because things have changed things will be better. They don’t always assess whether the change is needed. Consequently the heavy lifting on what really does need to change is frequently done by conservatives.

Does anyone who knows how America and the Democratic Party were tearing themselves apart in 1968, seriously think that Lyndon Johnson created a great society? But who can deny that it was Richard Nixon who gave America an Environmental Protection Agency?

In Australia, the White Australia policy was dismantled, Aboriginal people were first formally recognised as Australians and gay marriage became law under conservative governments.

This happened because conservatives can be better at freedom and openness and respect which are preconditions for the consensus essential for change.

Human fallibility has not ruined all of this world yet. I believe we can probably survive.

But we must find ways to come together to conserve.

In Australia right now that leadership job falls to conservative Scott Morrison not the apparatchiks of the Australian Labour Party.

The world is watching. The fires got their attention.

What will happen next?

Geoff Fox, 12 February, 2020, Melbourne

Mourning My Midwifery

From a career point of view I now have little to show for the three decades I spent as a midwife in Australia. That time came to an end because of two factors. First, there was the largely undebated destruction in the age of feminism of the publicly funded lying in period for new mothers; it wasnt undebated by me. Secondly an attack on me by a “progressive” politician misusing the police severely damaged my capacity to function as an Australian. I am still recovering, still in a state of shock;

Miwifery taught me much about the astonishing beauty of life when men and women combine in care of the newborn.

Why have western societies forgotten that?

Geoff Fox, 10th February, 2020, Terra Nullius

For "BANJO"

“Banjo” Paterson, who wrote the words for Waltzing Matilda in 1895, died on this day in 1941 as a result of a heart attack.

Waltzing Matilda tells the story of a swagman – a poor homeless man travelling on foot carrying his possessions in a “swag” slung over his back. This itinerant bloke commits suicide to escape arrest after he was caught by the authorities with a stolen sheep on a rich man’s property.

This song is famous for being Australia’s “unofficial national anthem.”

When it was one of four songs in a plebiscite to choose the official national song, I was one of the 28% who voted for it.

“Waltzing Matilda” is probably based on an incident at Combo Waterhole.

I visited the place when I was much younger and met one of the locals who confirmed for me that I was in fact at the place where “the swaggy took his jump.”

At that time the National Safety Council had placed a sign there with detailed instructions on how to perform mouth to mouth resuscitation.

How does it come to pass that the story of a homeless man who kills himself still represents the soul of Australia for very many Australians?

Lest we forget the lives of men.

Geoff Fox, January 6th, 2020, Terra Nullius.